A few December tiny house events

Before the cold weather really sets in and we bundle up in our houses (big or small), a few tiny house events happening in DC next week:

Thursday, December 8 @ 7:30PM
Tiny house talk + Q&A at Patagonia DC
Free admission, free snacks, and free beer! Jay will be talking about building and living in the Matchbox, and the big adventures living simply can provide. Doors open at 7PM.

Sunday, December 11 @ 11AM
Tiny house tour of the Matchbox
Take a tour of the 150-square-foot, off-grid house, currently situated right in the middle of a bustling and festive holiday tree farm, courtesy of Old City Farm & Guild.

Hope you can make it!

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The Matchbox at Old City Farm & Guild

 

Tour the Matchbox: September 15th, 2016

Between summer travel and summer heat, it’s been a quiet season for Boneyard Studios. But with cooling weather and lovely evenings ahead, we’re excited to announce another tiny house tour Thursday, September 15 at 6PM! After dozens and dozens of Sunday morning open houses, we’re curious to try out a weekday evening tour, aimed at those who may not be able to make it downtown on a weekend. The Matchbox (and only the Matchbox) will be open for viewing and a Q&A at 925 Rhode Island Avenue NW—home of Old City Farm & Guild, with a Metro stop, CaBi station, multiple bus stops, and plenty of bike parking (and car parking) nearby.

Like always, we’ll start promptly with a general introduction, so please arrive on time. Afterwards you’ll be free to ask questions, take photographs, check out the space and its many small and off-grid features, and take a walk around the lovely urban farm right in the Matchbox’s backyard. Catch a few more details on Facebook here, or head on over and register here. Hope to see you on the 15th!

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The Matchbox @ 925 Rhode Island Avenue NW

Tiny house tours are back again! Come tour the Matchbox April 10th

After a winter in hibernation, Boneyard Studios is back with more spring, summer, and fall tiny house events! Full calendar coming soon, but in the meantime—the first 2016 tour of the Matchbox will be on Sunday, April 10 from 11AM to 1PM. Come by to ask questions about simple living and tiny house design, walk through DC’s only fully off-grid and self-sustaining tiny home, and check out the awesome urban farm and garden center managed by our great friends at Old City Farm & Guild.

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As usual, we’ll do a big Q&A right at 11—so please arrive on time for that!—followed by a leisurely procession through the Matchbox (alas, the small house can’t exactly fit our enormous crowds all at once). Photography welcome, kids welcome, dogs welcome, everyone welcome (though please let us know if we can help arrange any special accommodations). We’re at 925 Rhode Island Ave NW, just a few minutes’ walk from the Shaw Metro (yellow/green) and tons of bus stops and CaBi stations. There’s ample room for bikes, and if you have to drive, street parking is available in the area.

Oh, one last thing: Boneyard Studios is a little non-profit that organizes big events abot tiny houses throughout the District. These tours cost a bit to put on (liability insurance, rental space, incidental repairs, etc.), so we’re asking for a small admittance donation if you can swing it (though you’ll always be welcome if you can’t). Either way, grab a spot here (or down below), and share with your Facebook buddies here. See you in April!

More information about the Matchbox here, and Boneyard Studios all over here. The Matchbox has been featured in the Washington PostCBS NewsDwellthe AtlanticTreehugger, the Washington City PaperNPRArchitectural Record, the National JournalUrban TurfCountry LivingThe DailyUK Mail Online, the New York Daily NewsABC7FOX5FOX NewsWAMUReasonInhabitat, and more.

TINY HOUSE EVENTS: tours and concerts this autumn

Many thanks to the 700+ people who came out on a (slightly soggy) afternoon to tour the Matchbox earlier this month. It’s clear that tiny house fever is still raging strong, so we’re thrilled to announce the first set of our 2015 fall events. All events (unless otherwise noted) will take place at the Matchbox’s new spot at Old City Farm & Guild, in a super-accessible location over at 925 Rhode Island Avenue NWSIgn up here!

Tuesday, October 6, 6:30PM: TINY HOUSE CONCERT
Featuring AndrewN and Talya TavorBYOB.

Sunday, October 18, 11AM: TINY HOUSE OPEN HOUSE
Tour the Matchbox and learn more about the tiny house movement.

Tuesday, October 20, 6:30PM: TINY HOUSE CONCERT
Featuring The Darkest Timeline. BYOB.

Friday, October 30, 6:30PM: TINY HOUSE CONCERT
Featuring Drive TFCBYOB.

Sunday, November 22, 11AM: TINY HOUSE OPEN HOUSE
Tour the Matchbox and learn more about the tiny house movement.

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Note: Just the Matchbox is at Old City Farm & Guild for now, so only one house is available for touring. But there’s loads of other cool stuff at the farm to look at (it is, after all, a farm). We’ll be posting more photos and information about the Matchbox’s new surroundings (very) soon, but if you just can’t wait, head on over to Old City for bulbs, pumpkins, seeds, flowers, planters, and a whole lot more in one of DC’s greatest examples of creative reuse of space. We’re all right in the heart of Shaw at 925 Rhode Island Ave NW.

Tiny houses and more: some exciting (and less-exciting) zoning changes in DC’s near future

Zoning isn’t sexy. It’s complex, mundane, and (for the most part) inaccessible to the average citizen. But it affects us all, good and bad, by shaping the urban environment we live in each and every day. And here in DC, we’re in the midst of perhaps the most exciting time for zoning this century (at least, as exciting as it gets). Bear with us, because creating a more progressive District requires your help:

The District of Columbia has been rewriting its very-outdated zoning regulations (last updated when Eisenhower was president) over the past few years, and we at Boneyard Studios have been ardent supporters of the project since our founding. In tours and testimony, to press and patrons, we’ve spoken of the need for our cities to do more to support affordable, reasonable residences. And for the most part, it’s been working.

What will the rewrite do? The Coalition for Smarter Growth has a great write-up here. For one, it’ll loosen up unnecessary and expensive and space-inefficient parking minimums around new developments. It’ll also relax the ban on corner stores, allowing for more walkable, community-minded neighborhoods throughout the District. And most closely to our hearts, it’ll take one (small) step forward in permitting more affordable and space-conscious dwellings like accessory dwelling units, carriage houses, and habitable basements.

What will it do for even tinier houses? Little, if anything. Tiny houses aren’t illegal in the District of Columbia, and though those choosing to reside in them aren’t given the same rights as those living in larger-footprint homes (like tax benefits or a certificate of occupancy), neither DC’s current code nor the rewrite would criminalize where one chooses to spend their days or evenings with permission of the landowner. It would establish and protect, as a matter or right, “camping” of an alley lot owner in a structure on her own land, yet prohibit open fires or camping for more than one month per year—odd, as these are already protected as a matter of right for any landowner in the District (pursuant to the fire code, of course). It would also grant, as a matter of right, the construction of code-compliant foundation-built small houses in alleyways (ignoring tiny houses on wheels, as they’re considered travel trailers under zoning regulations).

But it’s not all perfect. Deeper in, Subtitle U/601.1(a) vaguely criminalizes homelessness by prohibiting sleeping or loitering on vacant property (yet still allows camping as a matter of right when the property owner is in the loop). And /601.1(c) sets some oddly specific parameters around truly residential use in alley lots—not a problem for Boneyard Studios’ more mobile tiny houses on wheels (both of which are currently on private non-alley property with the owners’ permission), but still a tad restrictive for our liking. Certainly the changes are better than the initial rewrite revisions, but for others looking to cultivate creative urban infill in our great city, they may be a bit too cumbersome. In other words: this doesn’t directly impact Boneyard Studios, but it may directly impact you.

And truth be told, it’ll indirectly impact us all. DC’s alleyways are its hidden gem, its flowing capillaries, and we at Boneyard Studios want to see more of them put to good use. We’re for safe, sustainable development, and we’re happy to see some really great changes to DC’s zoning taking place. If you’re a DC resident, we don’t want to tell you what to think, but we do want to urge you what to think about. Take a look for yourself at Subtitle U and whatever other bits of the regulations review is dearest to your heart, and drop a comment in the sidebar wherever you agree or disagree. But do it soon, because the comment period ends September 25th!

Want to see a tiny house for yourself? Come on out to the DC State Fair this Saturday (September 12th), where we’ll be giving tours of the Matchbox every hour on the hour from 1PM to 6PM. That’s a lot of tours for a little house.

Keeping alley lots open for creative use means keeping laws smart and simple

Keeping alley lots open for creative use means keeping laws smart and simple

Tiny house tours are back: Another move for the Matchbox

It’s been a long year—three lovely locations, two messy moves, one little house just looking for home. And last week, the Matchbox moved yet again, available for tours and visits and concerts and much, much more very soon.

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Boneyard Studios has always been about local architecture, local arts, and local agriculture, and so we’re thrilled to be teaming up with the awesome folks at Old City Farm & Guild, the coolest urban garden center in the District. It’s a place where plants and people come together right in the center of the city (Shaw, to be exact), and this fall the Matchbox will be in the center of it all, adding some great tiny house events to Old City’s already wonderful set of community gatherings. It’s going to be a great autumn, and you’re welcome to join us in kicking things off right at the DC State Fair, hosted by Old City on Saturday, September 12 from 12PM to 8PM (more information here).

Our fall calendar is still in the works, so if you can’t make it to the fair, no worries—there will be many more opportunities to see the Matchbox coming up. Until then, here’s a little footage of the little house out on the big road:

Join us (and our awesome panel) for ‘Small is Beautiful’ next Tuesday, 7/21

A few weeks ago, we announced the DC premiere of Small is Beautiful: A Tiny House Documentary, hosted by Boneyard Studios at Woolly Mammoth Theatre. Just a reminder—it’s only one week away, and tickets are still available! We also promised a post-film Q&A with the DC area’s leading tiny house builders and owners, and are excited to announce our panel—

Moderated by Mary Fitch, AICP, Hon. AIA;  Executive Director of the American Institute of Architects DC
Robin Hayes; 
Tiny house builder and owner of Build Tiny
Amanda Stokes; Tiny house owner
Lee Pera; Tiny house owner and founder of Boneyard Studios
Jay Austin; Tiny house owner and co-founder of Boneyard Studios

So bring your questions, bring your loved ones, and bring your ticket—$15 now, $20 at the door (like all Boneyard Studios events, this one’s not-for-profit, and so we’re relying on your support to help us pay the space-and-screening bills). Can’t make it but still want to help us put on more events like this in the future? There’s a spot for donations, too.

WHEN: Tuesday, July 21, 2015, 8PM
WHERE: Woolly Mammoth Theatre (bike racks out front, street parking available, and just a short walk from any Metro line)

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Here’s one more look at the Small is Beautiful trailer:


Small is Beautiful is a revealing look into the tiny house movement, a grass roots response to the housing affordability crisis that traps people from across the developed world. In Portland, Oregon, we meet four characters, each of whom are at various stages of building and living in their own tiny homes. Ben is a 20-something single guy with an inheritance to spend and a design he drew, but an ambitious timeline and no building experience. Nikki and Mitchell are a young couple who, along with their two dogs, dream of bucking the strereotypical life style of buying a big house and spending the rest of their lives trying to pay it off. Karen, 50, has loved living in her tiny house for two years yet still struggles with the lack of permanency that comes with living in a house on wheels. Ultimately this story proves that it’s not what’s inside the walls of a tiny house that counts, but rather it is the strong community of like-minded people who support each other as they dare to be different. Runtime: 68 minutes.